The Great Woodland Tidy Job

It’s been on the cards for months now, and every time the wind picks up it brings to mind the mess that some of the old plantations are in along the west shore of the loch.  Some of the plantations will require considerably more than a couple of chainsaws and some man power to get them sorted, but for the patch of woodland at Mary’s Knowe near the ponds, we identified an area that we could really make a difference on in terms of appearance.

The excellent work done on day 1, with Jeremy running the chainsaw

The excellent work done on day 1, with Jeremy running the chainsaw

Tea time with the boss- day 2

Tea time with the boss- day 2

With so much wind damage, our first priority is always public safety, so trees that presented a real danger were felled and logged.  Much of the windblown damage was also logged, and the scrub that was cut from it was burned.

Alan hard at work with the Iron Horse

Alan hard at work with the Iron Horse

Lunch time on day 3- just before the wind and snow came in!

Lunch time on day 3- just before the wind and snow came in!

This time of year is the ideal time to be focusing on tree work of this sort, and we’re lucky that this year our group of regular volunteers has grown to between 5 and 8 people.  In recent weeks we have also welcomed Katja, Steve, David F., Leo and Rod to accompany Alan, David A. and Louise.  They’ve all put a shift in at Mary’s Knowe over the last couple of weeks, and it’s really satisfying work to leave a site looking so much better than when work started there.

The fire enabled us to clear much of the scrub as it was cut from the fallen trees

The fire enabled us to clear much of the scrub as it was cut from the fallen trees

One tree that posed a risk to public safety was on its way down

One tree that posed a risk to public safety was on its way down

Logging up became trickier close to the fire.

Logging up became trickier closer to the fire.

With Jeremy, Neil and I all spending some time out there with them, we’re now happy that it’s been a job well done, and provided mother nature doesn’t decide to do any more felling of her own, then tree work should be done in this area for at least another year.

Alan departs with the fully laden trusty steed

Alan departs with the fully laden trusty steed

Katja and David A. minding the fire before we departed

Katja and David A. minding the fire before we departed

The log piles are a vast improvement on what was a shambles before work started

The log piles are a vast improvement on what was a shambles before work started

The satisfaction of seeing the fruits of your labour!

The satisfaction of seeing the fruits of your labour!

Next on the agenda for our group of volunteers will be more tree work, first at some of the Old Railway ponds by the new section of Heritage Trail, then hopefully back to a patch of encroaching willow further north at Mary’s Knowe.  It is as always, a race against time.  Once spring sets in and the birds begin to nest, it’ll be chainsaws scrubbed up and locked down for another season.

About Craig.Nisbet

Reserve Officer Loch Leven National Nature Reserve Scottish Natural Heritage
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s