A cracking day up Corrie Fee NNR

Corrie Fee NNR

Corrie Fee NNR

In the absence of full time SNH staff at Corrie Fee NNR, the Loch Leven team are responsible for monitoring the condition of the infrastructure up there.  This focuses mainly on the deer fence which excludes deer and sheep from an area within Corrie Sharroch, in order to promote the regeneration of alpine botany, particularly wooly willow– a montane dwarf tree that has been in decline due to over-grazing for many years in Scotland.

Deer fence damage to be repaired

Deer fence damage to be repaired

The deer fence took a battering during the cold winter, and bits of the fence have been marked up for repair as soon as possible.

Always a great day out, Corrie Fee is an excellent geological spectacle, and specifically designated as a National Nature Reserve because of its alpine vegetation.  Walking the route with Steve is a real treat, as his knowledge of the botany up there is superb.  The woodland approach to the NNR has potential for glimpses of crossbill, red squirrel and maybe even Scottish wildcat, but the botany already catches the eye.

Foxglove

Foxglove

Hard Fern

Hard Fern

Hard Fern

Hard Fern

Chickweed-wintergreen

Chickweed-wintergreen

Into the amphitheatre the infrastructure check begins, and through the wet grassland harbours an array of species with botanical interest.

Heath-spotted Orchid

Heath-spotted Orchid

Mountain Pansy

Mountain Pansy

Wood Horsetail

Wood Horsetail

Butterwort

Butterwort

Further up the corrie the vegetation shifts to more montane specialist species, including the following:

Starry Saxifrage

Starry Saxifrage

Cloudberry

Cloudberry

Lesser Twayblade

Lesser Twayblade

The latter picture above of the Lesser Twayblade represented the highlight of Steve’s month- as the first individual of this species he had managed to find himself.  What a fine specimen it was too.

The view from the top of the corrie looking down offers a spectacular view, provided you have a head for heights.

view from the top

view from the top

Of course, the usual mountain wildlife was about, including the following:

Mountain Hare

Mountain Hare

Meadow Pipit

Meadow Pipit

Silver-ground Carpet

Silver-ground Carpet

Common Cow-wheat

Common Cow-wheat

Well worth a visit when you get the chance.  Be sure to stop in at the Glen Doll Ranger Base prior to your visit, to check in and for more information from Neil and Graham.

About Craig.Nisbet

Reserve Officer Loch Leven National Nature Reserve Scottish Natural Heritage
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